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Short films about London

Short films about London

If you live or work in London, you probably love and hate pretty much the same things as everyone else who has to commute, put up with tube delays, property prices and slow-walking people. Those ‘loves’ and ‘hates are perfectly captured in a series of one-minute videos produced by Meehow’s own director, Michal who last year started the Love/Hate/London project. Each video is only one minute long (or thereabouts) and asks two simple questions: what do you love and what do you hate about London? Each film is a standalone piece featuring one Londoner who praises the capital’s delights – from the architecture to the people and the unique experiences London has to offer – and complains about the one thing they hate. And it’s fascinating to hear what people dislike about London. All films are optimised for social and live on a dedicated Facebook page as well as on Instagram. So head over there to browse though the series (new episodes are added all the time). This is also a perfect example of what can be created for social in a relatively short space of time with limited resources – but without compromising either on quality or the storytelling aspect of the project. Here are some of the recent videos in the...

Facebook to share ad revenue with video creators

If you read our post about Facebook becoming a major YouTube competitor a few months ago, today’s news should surprise you at all. According to Re/code, some video content providers will start receiving ad revenue share beginning this autumn. It’s the first time Facebook has done any kind of revenue share around video. So far, Facebook was all about the reach, but if you wanted to monetise your video output, you’d still stick to YouTube. Not any more. But, as always with Facebook, things are not that simple. There will be a new feature called Suggested Videos, which means that only some of the videos show in user’s News Feed will be monetised. Then there is the split: Facebook will keen 45%, with the remaining 55% going to the video creators, but as Re/code explains, if a user watches three videos and just one ad (yes, Facebook pre-roll ads, here we come!), the revenue (ie. the 55%) will be split among the three videos, based on how long you watched each. As this will be a brand new revenue stream for Facebook, expect a lot of tweaks, changes and experiments. But we’re curious to see how YouTube will respond to the new...

Facebook video – why you should pay attention

So you think YouTube is the only distribution channel for your videos? Well, erectile you have a problem. YouTube might be the most popular video platform, generic but it’s certainly not the only one – and Facebook has recently become a strong and fast-growing YouTube competitor. Here’s why you should start paying attention to Facebook video. 1. A gigantic audience In January Mark Zuckerberg revealed that there are 3 billion video views on Facebook daily. Yes, daily. Facebook’s push towards video has been evident for a while, but now the social network is fast becoming the preferred distribution channel for many content makers, including brands. And the really important fact about that staggering number? According to Zuckerberg, the figures refer to native video only, i.e. videos that have been uploaded to facebook directly, not embedded from other services or linked to other third-party video platforms like YouTube or Vimeo. Three. Billion. Views. Daily. And that leads us to the next important factor: 2. Facebook’s native video performs better Naturally Facebook prefers to keep people on their own platform rather than redirect to external services, so it prioritises native video in users’ feeds. What it means in layman’s terms is that in theory a video uploaded directly to Facebook should perform better than the same video uploaded to YouTube and then embedded on Facebook. This is a huge opportunity for those who up to now have focused on YouTube as their only video hub. Facebook continues to work on optimising the delivery as so far most of the native videos (which should auto-play in users’ feeds) defaulted to standard definition....