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Make your space look gorgeous with Harth

Make your space look gorgeous with Harth

There’s a new startup that is changing the way we furnish our spaces forever. It’s called Harth and we are proud to be working with them on their first promotional video. The founders, Henrietta Thompson and Ed Padmore, have come up with the concept for Harth while dealing with their own furniture and storage issues. In this short video which we filmed on location in a gorgeous mansion in Central London, Henrietta and Ed explain why they came up with the idea and how Harth works. HARTH from Meehow Films on...
How to create a good video for your business

How to create a good video for your business

You’ve just spent a small fortune on some branded videos and saw little traction. Or maybe you are planning to shoot some promotional videos, but are worried about the cost and ideas. Or perhaps you are not sure if video is even what your company – or your clients – need. According to Contently, an established content marketing company, by 2020 82% of consumer internet traffic will be video. Visual content dominates over traditional written content and with multiple new platforms competing for our eyeballs, this trend is likely to increase even further. So why video? It’s easier to make an instant emotional connection through video. It’s more engaging than static text. It comes in a number of formats, some of which are relatively easy to produce. It’s omnipresent on social media and highly shareable. But because of their omnipresence, many videos get lost in the noise, create little interest and ultimately undermine business owners’ trust in the medium. So before you launch your next video project and campaign for your business, product or service, increase its chances of success by honestly – and I mean, hand on heart – answering the following 5 questions: 1. Why do you need a video? Do you have a product to showcase? A service to explain? Or perhaps you don’t want to go for the hard sell and instead want to create an empathetic company film to entice new people to your team? Creating, say, a crowdfunding video is different from creating a multi-part educational series for your existing or potential customers. You need to understand why you are thinking of creating...
What is Facebook Watch?

What is Facebook Watch?

In simple terms: Facebook Watch is the social giant’s original video channel or hub. Mark Zuckerberg’s vision of Facebook’s future is all about video and Facebook Watch – announced recently and often referred to as “YouTube competitor” – is now available to all Facebook users in the US. Available via the native mobile apps, desktop as well as TV apps, Facebook Watch will offer hundreds of new shows (as opposed to random clips and third-party video content) created exclusively for the platform by a range of partners. Some productions will be co-financed by Facebook, some will be sponsored by new media partnerships. Initial reception (well, it’s early days) has been lukewarm – right now there are no high quality productions to match what Netflix or Amazon Prime can offer. Most of the launch content seems to focus on reality shows and some scripted comedy shows, but there are more ambitious plans to launch proper scripted shows in the future. If you liked Humans of New York, the wildly-popular photography/Instagram phenomenon, you will also be able to watch “Humans of New York” the TV show on Facebook Watch. Other channels soon available on Facebook Watch include Discovery, Tastemade and Major League Baseball. But that’s the future. For now critics lament  over-reliance on cheap productions, way too much serialised reality TV-style content and poor layout. Facebook Watch – for now available to users in the US – is likely to be rolled out to users outside the States at some point in the future....
Where people watch video in 2017

Where people watch video in 2017

This is a follow-up post to my yesterday piece about vertical video as I have just come across a piece on Jeff Bullas’s website about marketing in a video-first world. (NB, in itself the piece is a brilliant piece of marketing, as this is a sponsored post, but offers really valuable insights and, more importantly, a well-presented infographic.) The infographic below, which I shamelessly borrowed from the post, compiles an Animoto survey findings and offers brilliant insights into how marketers use video and how users consume it. Animoto asked 1,000 consumers and 500 marketers about their video habits. For me, the main takeways are these: Facebook is ahead of YouTube in terms of consumption and marketing efforts when it comes to video Instagram Stories have – in a very short time – become as important as Facebook for video consumption, but engagement is much higher on other platforms Marketers invest in Facebook and YouTube videos first, Twitter and Instagram second, but want to invest in the latter more Repurposing existing content seems to be the quickest and most efficient way of creating relevant video content Most people consume video on mobile devices and mostly in the afternoon/evening and 80% of Facebook videos are watched with the sound off (which again drives home the importance of well thought-out captions and on-screen graphics Attention spans are very short on mobile, slightly better on desktop (so no surprise there), but people are more willing to watch longer videos (i.e. over 1 minute) if the content is educational It’s amazing how important Facebook has become and how quickly Instagram and Instagram Stories in...
Vertical video is probably here to stay

Vertical video is probably here to stay

It’s 2017 and I think even the most conservative purists are beginning to see that vertical video – until recently ridiculed and regarded as something beneath many filmmakers – is here to stay. What’s more, it sells. As always, market forces, combined with technological advances have determined what and how we consume, at least on mobile (your TV or cinema screen may not go vertical for a while). Both Snapchat and Instagram Stories rely on full-screen video experiences and most of the videos are vertical. Some users do flip the phone for widescreen experience (some even give people warnings to flip their phones to view their stories horizontally), but most social videos are vertical. Publishers using Facebook or Twitter to distribute their content also made the switch. Some use a combination of vertical and square formats, others stick on one format knowing that most of their audiences consume the content on the go, i.e on mobile. Why am I writing about all of this? I just came across this Inc. article that’s intended to convert the undecided. Here’s a tl;dr summary if you don’t want to read the entire piece: Vertical video converts: “According to Snapchat, ads displayed vertically are 9x more likely to be watched all the way through. Engagement is 3x higher”. If it works for Snapchat, it works for others too. Probably. Vertical provides fewer distractions: debatable whether that’s really the case particularly when users add filters, emojis and scribble over the footage, but, as Inc. says, “the point of interest is more defined and focused and can create a greater sense of intimacy and engagement...